Money, Not Stuff?

Dear Everyone Who Wants to Help,

Kimberly Graham lost her home in Moore, Oklahoma. Here, she sits, holding onto a personal picture she found near her home. (Photo courtesy of Red CrossOKC)
Kimberly Graham lost her home in Moore, Oklahoma. Here, she sits, holding onto a personal picture she found near her home on May 20, 2013. (Photo courtesy of Red Cross OKC)

During a Red Cross disaster response, the best way to help a disaster victim is by making a money donation. Here’s why:

1. Financial contributions allow the Red Cross to purchase what’s needed for disaster relief operations. Monetary donations enable the Red Cross to purchase relief supplies close to the disaster site which avoids delays and transportation costs in getting basic necessities to disaster victims.

2. Donating cash allows the people affected by disaster to put money back into their local economy. Because the affected community has generally experienced significant economic loss, purchasing relief supplies in or close to the disaster site also helps to stimulate the weakened local economy.

3. Donating cash allows individuals to buy what they need. Many people affected by the tornado that hit Moore, Oklahoma, for example, were at work during the storm. All they have are work clothes. They need of clothes and shoes to wear during the clean-up.

4. Many times people want to send stuff: small items such as collections of canned food and used clothing and shoes. But these items must be sorted and repackaged, a process that wastes valuable resources of money, time, and people that are needed for other aspects of Red Cross disaster relief operations.

Please consider making a money donation to the American Red Cross. You can text REDCROSS to 90999 to give $10 to American Red Cross Disaster Relief, go online to redcross.org, or call 1-800-REDCROSS.

We, and the disaster survivors we help, are grateful for your support.

Andrea Bredow
American Red Cross Disaster Relief Volunteer

Author: American Red Cross

The American Red Cross provides relief to victims of disasters and helps people prevent, prepare for and respond to emergencies. The Minnesota Region serves 5.2 million people across Minnesota and part of western Wisconsin.

3 thoughts on “Money, Not Stuff?”

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