Charitable Work Does Everyone Good: Spotlight on Anna Sullivan Kyle

rco_blog_img_annakyleThis 1944 Myron Hall photo shows St. Cloud Area Red Cross officials planning for their next project. Anne Kyle is sitting at her desk, John Henry standing on the right and Mrs. J. L. Rivard is off to the left.

Story by Steve Penick, Head Archivist at the Stearns History Museum

Volunteers make a difference in any community. These generous individuals help the homeless, teach kids to read, and provide assistance during a natural disaster. This dedication helps not only those in need but inspires others to contribute what they can to make the world a better place.

Anna or Anne Sullivan Kyle (1891-1963) was one such person. She moved to St. Cloud, Minnesota from Minneapolis in 1926 and began volunteering for the American Red Cross. Anne reflected on what volunteering meant to her. She stated in a 1957 St. Cloud Times article, “It’s self-satisfying. And you get pleasure out of knowing that you have really helped others.” Even though the Red Cross was her primary concern, she did not limit herself to just one organization.

In this world, people should be kept busy on something worthwhile, either church work or some charitable work. It does everyone some good.

Kyle also volunteered for the Auxiliary at the Wallace S. Chute Post in 1927 and rapidly worked her way toward president of the Sixth District several years later. Soon Anne reached the state level as a member of the Rehabilitation Committee, one in which she chaired. In her spare time, Anne became president of the Women’s Guild and the St. Cloud Area Council of the Parent and Teachers Association.

Anne’s work with the Red Cross would in time transition into a staff position. Despite the death of her husband Edwin in 1938, she continued her efforts to help the St. Cloud community. In 1942, Anne was appointed Executive Secretary, encouraging others to volunteer and help in the war effort. Her humble philosophy, though, continued to be a model for others. “In this world, people should be kept busy on something worthwhile, either church work or some charitable work. It does everyone some good.” Almost sixty years later, Kyle’s words ring true about her commitment in making a better community.

Originally published on the Stearns History Museum Facebook page, this story appears here with permission. Thank you!

My son’s superheroes are Red Cross volunteers

Story and photos by Kristen Threinen, Nurse Assistant Training Program Manager, American Red Cross 

rco_blog_img_noah-t-shirt-2Following a quick visit to our Red Cross centennial kick-off celebration in Minneapolis, my son Noah has had a lot of questions about the Red Cross.

And then, several days later, Noah’s 2nd grade class was given the option to dress-up as their favorite superhero. When I asked him that Tuesday evening (the day I received communication about dress-up day) if he wanted to dress-up he promptly responded, “YES!” He then stated he wanted to dress as a “real-life superhero,” a Red Cross volunteer.

img_0650-3I frantically emailed a co-worker, asking if there was any way I could purchase a Red Cross T-shirt. The co-worker came through as my Red Cross superhero with the shirt Noah’s wearing above.

Noah was beyond proud going to school dressed as a Red Cross superhero. And then, having the opportunity to walk with me in the St. Paul Winter Carnival parade was the icing on the cake!

rco_blog_img_noahI’m so grateful to have the opportunity to expose my son to the Red Cross mission to reduce human suffering…it’s humbling and inspiring.

Click here to learn more about Minnesota Red Cross Century of Service events throughout 2017. Also, use the social media hashtag #MNRedCross100 to share your Red Cross stories with us.

Thinking of becoming a Red Cross volunteer? These three opportunities support disaster relief.

Icon Disaster ServicesThis year, are you thinking of becoming a Red Cross volunteer? Right now in Minnesota, we’re recruiting for three opportunities supporting disaster relief. Each position ensures disaster workers can deliver humanitarian aid at home and around the corner. 

Icon DisasterSupport daily operations for disaster relief services
The American Red Cross serving Twin Cities Area seeks a volunteer to support instructor-led training by scheduling in-person classes and performing other administrative tasks, as needed. This is a flexible-schedule position that can be performed remotely during daytime hours. If interested, please contact Angela Antony (angela.antony@redcross.org).

Icon DisasterPrepare new volunteers for Red Cross disaster relief service
The American Red Cross serving Twin Cities Area seeks volunteers to assist Workforce Engagement with bringing on-board new disaster volunteers. This role guides new volunteers through the first steps of joining the Red Cross, from turning in the right paperwork and signing up for training, to helping them feel prepared for their roles. On-boarding volunteers enjoy working with people, being flexible, and serving on a team. If interested, please contact Hannah Linsk (hannah.linsk@redcross.org).

Icon DisasterHelp volunteers get out the door to disaster relief responses
The Minnesota Region needs volunteers to help deploy volunteers to both regional and national disasters. Deployment team members will assign volunteers to Disaster Relief Operations (DROs), give the proper information regarding deployment procedures, distribute mission cards, and perform other duties as necessary. The best candidates will be comfortable working with online platforms and on the telephone. Help us volunteers get out the door! If interested, please contact Susan Waananen (susan.waananen@redcross.org).

rco_blog_img_centenniallogoIt’s a great year to join us! Click here to learn more about our Century of Service, year-long celebration during 2017. #mnredcross100

Post by Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross Minnesota Region

What’s it like to be a refugee?

This September 9-11, the Red Cross will be taking part in a humanitarian crisis simulation put on by the University of Minnesota. The goal of the weekend event is for participants to gain an understanding of the realities and difficulties facing humanitarian aid professionals and the people they serve. Volunteers, role-playing as refugees, doctors, United Nations Peacekeepers, and others, will transform a boy-scout camp in Cannon Falls, Minnesota into the scene of an international humanitarian crisis. Participants will encounter displaced refugees, outbreaks of disease, roving militias, and many multidisciplinary problems typical of humanitarian catastrophes.

University of Minnesota humanitarian crisis simulation course (Photo credit: UMN)
University of Minnesota humanitarian crisis simulation course (Photo credit: UMN)

Pj Doyle, a longtime Red Cross volunteer for the Minnesota Region, explains how the Red Cross’s involvement in the simulation helps the larger community: “As stewards of the Geneva Conventions, each national society is charged with disseminating information on International Humanitarian Law to citizens. This humanitarian simulation provides hands-on means for our chapter of the American Red Cross to fulfill this role.” Volunteers from the Minnesota Red Cross region will be role-playing as delegates from the International Committee of the Red Cross. During the simulation they will work on registering refugee role-players.

The simulation started in 2011 as a collaborative project co led by faculty in the Schools of Medicine and Public Affairs. Since then it has expanded to include the involvement of several different schools at the University of Minnesota and various NGOs, as well as the Minnesota National Guard. During the simulation, participants first attend didactic sessions that cover issues common to humanitarian catastrophes. Participants are then placed in multidisciplinary groups and act as emergency response teams. Throughout the weekend, these teams will assess various “camps” and “villages” as they assess problems such as malnutrition, security, and human rights violations. After their assessment, each team will develop a proposal for an intervention and present their solution to a board.

University of Minnesota humanitarian crisis simulation, 2015 (Photo credit: UMN)
University of Minnesota humanitarian crisis simulation, 2015 (Photo credit: UMN)

The course is a valuable learning experience for anyone who is interested in or currently pursuing a career in humanitarian aid work, as well as professionals currently working with former refugees. It is offered for a fee to adult participants from the community, and as a one credit graduate elective at the University of Minnesota. While the course places an emphasis on the public health aspects of humanitarian relief, the simulation provides an opportunity for anyone to develop and shape skills necessary for success in all areas of humanitarian work.

Photo credit: UMN
Photo credit: UMN

Both participants and volunteers are still needed and welcome for the simulation. Those interested in participating as a student or volunteering can learn more by emailing umnsim@umn.edu. To see more photos from the 2015 humanitarian simulation, click here.

Story by Adam Holte, American Red Cross Minnesota Region, International Services Intern

Vonnie Thomas, a courageous Red Cross volunteer for 65 years

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Vonnie Thomas on her official day, June 28, 2016. Photo: Lara Leimbach

June 28, 2016 was officially Vonnie Thomas Day in Minnesota after Governor Mark Dayton proclaimed it so in honor of Ms. Thomas’s sixty-five years of courageous Red Cross volunteer service. Read the proclamation below to learn about this remarkable woman and how she has helped and inspired many people in many ways. 

State of Minnesota Proclamation for Vonnie Thomas

Whereas, the American Red Cross depends on the power of volunteers to accomplish its mission of preventing and alleviating suffering; and

Whereas, Nurse Vonnie Thomas has generously volunteered thousands of hours in distinguished leadership service through the American Red Cross over the past 65 years; and

Whereas, she courageously cared for those hurt by more than 40 local, national and international disasters such as the 2012 tornadoes in Minneapolis, the September 11 terrorist attacks on the Pentagon, Hurricane Katrina and the 35-W Bridge Collapse; and

Whereas, she has served in many roles on a local, division and national level and is currently a member of the Minnesota Region volunteer leadership team and Disaster Health Services lead and a Staff Wellness Consultant for 13 states;  and

Whereas, she is an exceptional leader, innovator, medical professional, skilled instructor, and humanitarian and mentor, and is beloved by staff and volunteers alike; and

Whereas, she is a vibrant, engaged and active volunteer leading a statewide effort to build Integrated Care Teams in Minnesota to help families who’ve lost a loved one, and greatly contributed to the  development and implementation of the training materials; and

Whereas, her tremendous voluntary service has been recognized with numerous awards, including the Florence Nightingale Medal, the highest international honor awarded by the International Committee of the Red Cross/Red Crescent, which celebrates the contributions of nurses and nursing aides to the work of the International Red Cross/Red Crescent Movement;  and

Whereas, she finds inspiration in the words of the founder of the American Red Cross, Nurse Clara Barton: “You must never so much think as whether you like it or not, whether it is bearable or not; you must never think of anything except the need, and how to meet it.”; and

Whereas, she embodies the principles and spirit of the Red Cross and is a wonderful example of unselfish, humble and dedicated service, and an inspiration for us all;

Now, therefore, I, Mark Dayton, Governor of Minnesota, do hereby proclaim June 28, 2016 Vonnie Thomas Day in the State of Minnesota.

Peter Spokes, a wholehearted Red Cross volunteer for 65 years

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Peter Spokes has served 65 years as a Red Cross volunteer. Photo: Lara Leimbach

The Governor of Minnesota, Mark Dayton, declared June 28, 2016, as Peter Spokes Day in recognition of 65 years of volunteer service to the American Red Cross. Read below the proclamation words to learn more about the wholehearted leadership Mr. Spokes has given to us all. 

State of Minnesota Proclamation for Peter R. Spokes

Whereas, the American Red Cross depends on the power of volunteers to accomplish its mission of preventing and alleviating suffering;

Whereas, Peter R. Spokes has generously volunteered thousands of hours in distinguished leadership service through the American Red Cross since 1950; and

Whereas, he was recognized and appreciated by the British Red Cross Society for his valuable services rendered during World War II; and

Whereas, he has served as a division and national level volunteer leader, including as a member of the Northwest Division Advisory Council, a member and chair of the National Red Cross Committee on Nominations, as Chairman of the 1974 National Convention in Minneapolis; and

Whereas, he accepted and embraced wholeheartedly his Lifetime Board Membership with the American Red Cross in 1980; and

Whereas, he has led in multiple officer positions on the Board of Directors in Minnesota, including Chair, Vice Chair and Treasurer, and has served on a dozen Board Committees throughout the years, and continues committee service to this day; and

Whereas, his inspirational leadership, wisdom, energy, and generosity led to the successful capital campaign and construction project to complete the regional chapter headquarters building in Minneapolis; and

Whereas, his steadfast commitment and incredible vision played a vital role in unifying the Minneapolis and St. Paul Chapters into the Twin Cities Area Chapter; and

Whereas, he is described by his fellow Red Crossers as a bright, shining example, and as having a true sense of servant leadership; and

Whereas, through his kindness and compassion, dedication and leadership, thousands of people around the state, across the country and around the world have been helped through the American Red Cross;

Now, therefore, I, Mark Dayton, Governor of Minnesota, do hereby proclaim June 28, 2016 as Peter Spokes Day in the State of Minnesota.

Red Cross volunteers deserve our thanks

Red Cross volunteer Susan Cebelinski checked in at the Red Cross office in Duluth, Minnesota, on April 6, 2016, before going to Louisiana where she will provide emotional support to people impacted by the flooding. Thank you Susan!
Red Cross volunteer Susan Cebelinski checked in at the Red Cross office in Duluth, Minnesota, on April 6, 2016, before going to Louisiana where she will provide emotional support to people impacted by the flooding. Thank you Susan!

Volunteer /välənˈtir/
Noun
someone who freely offers to take part in an enterprise or undertake a task

American Red Cross Volunteer
/əˈmerəkən/ /red/ /krôs/ /välənˈtir/
Person
someone who freely donates time to community and country by participating in life changing and saving service 

Without volunteers the American Red Cross and its mission to help others would never be fulfilled. The Red Cross depends on volunteers to embrace service within their communities and to come together in times of crisis. During National Volunteer Week, April 10-16, we have the chance to express our gratitude to the women and men, heroes and leaders, and old and young, who voluntarily give their time and expertise, and wear the Red Cross on their shirt sleeves, while working to reduce human suffering.

National Volunteer Week is important to the Red Cross because it has nearly 330,000 volunteers nationwide. From a disaster worker helping one or hundreds, to a military responder comforting an injured solider or family member, or to a blood donor ambassador welcoming someone who’s about to roll-up a sleeve for a cancer patient waiting for lifesaving blood, the Red Cross offers a range of volunteer positions that serve others, both neighbor and stranger. Whether Red Cross volunteers are waking up in the night to assist a family after a fire or teaching a class on how to give first aid, all of them deserve a sincere thank you from us and many others.

To this we say, THANK YOU RED CROSS VOLUNTEERS! Without you, who knows where so many people in need would be today. You’re the light that shines from this organization and you continue to make a difference in your local communities, and across our country, one voluntary service action at a time. Thank you for the hours and hours you’ve given and the number of lives you’ve made better. We know that you generally take the humble path, but during National Volunteer Week it’s your turn to take a bow and accept our applause. We’re grateful for all that you do!

If you’re not a Red Cross volunteer but you know someone who is, give them a hug and say thanks. Ask them about their volunteer service. The many hours they spend helping others is remarkable and worth hearing about. Maybe their stories will inspire you to become a Red Cross volunteer and be the hero in someone’s life.