Thanks to dedicated and caring volunteers

During National Volunteer Week (this year, April 23-29) we like to do an extra shout out of appreciation for our volunteers who help fulfill the American Red Cross mission to reduce human suffering in the face of emergencies. The generous donation of time, expertise, and compassion make our hearts swoon with gratitude. Below, check out several spotlights featuring volunteers from selected areas around our Minnesota Region. Thanks!

Northern Minnesota

Tim Rose

Two northern Minnesota volunteers, Tim Rose and John Keith, have gone above and beyond our expectations with their diligent work in making appointments and installing smoke detectors in people’s homes. Within the last few months they have installed 419 alarms in 130 homes in our 17 county northern Minnesota chapter jurisdiction. We find this mission extremely important as our chapter alone has had 8 people perish due to a home fire this past winter season.  We could hot ask for more dedicated and caring volunteers, like Tim and John, to help carry out this important initiative of the American Red Cross!

John Keith

We are assured when they go to someone’s home that they provide them with the preparedness information needed for making a plan to evacuate in case of an emergency. From hearing their stories on their return from a smoke alarm installation, we also know they make a personal connection with the homeowner. They went to one home to install free smoke alarms where a World War II veteran mentioned the story of the Red Cross charging for donuts and coffee to active service members when in Europe. The veteran told John he had to walk 10 miles to get coffee and a donut and paid a nickel for it.  After John told him that the Red Cross started charging only because the U.S. Secretary of War asked it to do so because free Red Cross donuts caused tension with British soldiers who had to pay for theirs. The Red Cross complied, after protesting to no avail. The veteran said with a big smile “looks like I got my nickel back.”

Southwest Minnesota

Don and Betty Gedrose

Don and Betty Gedrose from Southwest Minnesota have been hard at work supporting the Red Cross Home Fire Campaign. Together, they have installed over 130 smoke alarms in the Brown County area since mid-December. They’re also taking a huge role in helping to plan a Brown County Home Fire Campaign on April 22. “We encourage people to take advantage of this free initiative, to check their smoke alarms regularly, and to regularly conduct two-minute fire drills at home,” says Betty Gedrose.

Biomedical Services

Mark Steffer

Since joining the Biomedical Team as a Transportation Specialist in December 2016, Mark Steffer has far exceeded the commitments placed before him. Not only has he managed to accrue twice as many work hours required, he has become an integral member of our volunteer driving force. His dedication to the driving program, and to the Red Cross in general, has enabled us to deliver life-saving blood products to area hospitals during  critical need asks—and has helped save and improve countless lives. Mark has continuously gone above and beyond as a Red Cross volunteer, holding an impressive 30+ positions within the organization as both Biomedical Services and Humanitarian Services volunteer. In the last year alone, Mark has donated over 700 hours of his time to helping our organization provide support to those in need. Throughout it all, Mark has exhibited a passion for the humanities—both through his volunteer work, and in the arts. He, like all of our volunteers, remind us every day of how lucky we are to be able to give back to the communities we serve. Thank you, Mark!

To learn about becoming a Red Cross volunteer, click here.

#JoasStrong blood drive raises awareness for need

On March 8, MHC Software in Burnsville, Minn., hosted the #JoasStrong blood drive, collecting 41 pints of blood in honor of employee Bryan Joas. While riding a bicycle home from work on March 8, 2016, Bryan was hit by a car that fled the scene of the accident. The accident left him with life-threatening injuries that required 12 surgeries during his 88-day hospital stay. During this time, he received at least 35 units of blood and 11 units of platelets to help save his life. Now, Bryan and his wife Shauna are dedicated to raising awareness about the need for blood donation. You never know when you or someone you love will need blood, says Bryan. “Without lifesaving blood, my condition might be very different. I’m living proof that blood helps save lives.”

Bryan and wife Shauna were blood donors before the accident. And once they even went on a blood donation date! Although Bryan has some ongoing medical issues, he’s working full-time and looking forward to riding his bicycle again this spring and summer. Although unable to donate blood right now, hopes that he will be able to in the future. “I’m just a cheerleader right now, but I hope to be able to donate in the future,” he says. Bryan’s story is a testimony that blood on the shelves help save lives. Thanks to all people working to ensure that the Red Cross is able to support a stable blood supply for hospitals and patients we serve.

To help ensure a sufficient supply for patients, make an appointment to give now at rcblood.org/2nqkmU8. Click here to learn about hosting an American Red Cross blood drive; or contact Mary Pucel, Donor Recruitment Director, at mary.pucel@redcross.org or 651-291-3366.

Story and photo by Sue Thesenga, American Red Cross North Central Blood Services

Spring can bring devastating weather

Spring can be a time for devastating weather. It’s the peak time of year for tornadoes, flooding, thunderstorms and other severe weather.
The American Red Cross wants you to know what steps you can take to stay safe if dangerous weather is predicted for your community.

PREPARE

  • Download the free Red Cross Emergency App. Available in English and Spanish, the app features expert advice on how to prepare and respond to tornadoes, floods and other disasters. It also features real-time local alerts for severe weather and hazards and a map with local Red Cross shelters open when a major disaster happens. You can text GETEMERGENCY to 90999 or search “Red Cross Emergency” in the Apple App Store or Google Play Store.
  • Get a Kit. Make a Plan. Be informed. Use Be Red Cross Ready tips in English or Spanish. If you or a member of your household is an individual with access or functional needs, including a disability, consider developing a comprehensive evacuation plan in advance with family, care providers and care attendants, as appropriate. Complete a personal assessment of functional abilities and possible needs during and after an emergency or disaster situation, and create a personal support network to assist. A great resource is FEMA’s online landing page for people with disabilities.

TORNADO SAFETY

  • Tornado Watch – Tornadoes are possible in and near the watch area. Review and discuss your emergency plans, and check supplies and your safe room. Be ready to act quickly if a warning is issued or you suspect a tornado is approaching. Acting early helps to save lives!
  • Tornado Warning – A tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. Tornado warnings indicate imminent danger to life and property. Go immediately underground to a basement, storm cellar or an interior room (closet, hallway or bathroom).
  • During any storm, listen to local news or a NOAA Weather Radio to stay informed about tornado watches and warnings.
  • Know your community’s warning system. Communities have different ways of warning residents about tornadoes, with many having sirens intended for outdoor warning purposes.
  • Pick a safe room in your home where household members and pets may gather during a tornado. This should be a basement, storm cellar or an interior room on the lowest floor with no windows.
  • Practice periodic tornado drills so that everyone knows what to do if a tornado is approaching.

Click here for more tornado safety tips.

THUNDERSTORM SAFETY

  • Listen to local news or NOAA Weather Radio for emergency updates. Watch for signs of a storm, like darkening skies, lightning flashes or increasing wind.
  • Postpone outdoor activities if thunderstorms are likely to occur. Many people struck by lightning are not in the area where rain is occurring.
  • If you can hear thunder, you are close enough to be in danger from lightning. If thunder roars, go indoors! The National Weather Service recommends staying inside for at least 30 minutes after the last thunder clap.
  • Avoid electrical equipment and telephones. Use battery-powered TVs and radios instead.
  • Shutter windows and close outside doors securely. Keep away from windows.
  • Do not take a bath or shower or use plumbing.
  • If you are driving, try to safely exit the roadway and park. Stay in the vehicle and turn on the emergency flashers until the heavy rain ends. Avoid touching metal or other surfaces that conduct electricity in and outside the vehicle.

Click here for more severe thunderstorm safety steps. 

FLOOD SAFETY

  • Listen to area radio and television stations and a NOAA Weather Radio for possible flood warnings and reports of flooding in progress or other critical information from the National Weather Service (NWS).
  • Be prepared to evacuate at a moment’s notice.
  • When a flood or flash flood warning is issued for your area, head for higher ground and stay there.
  • Turn Around, Don’t Drown! Stay away from floodwaters. Just 6 inches of moving water can knock you down, and less than 2 feet of water can sweep your vehicle away.
  • Keep children out of the water. They are curious and often lack judgment about running water or contaminated water.
  • Be especially cautious at night when it is harder to recognize flood danger.

Click here for more flood safety tips.

Charitable Work Does Everyone Good: Spotlight on Anna Sullivan Kyle

rco_blog_img_annakyleThis 1944 Myron Hall photo shows St. Cloud Area Red Cross officials planning for their next project. Anne Kyle is sitting at her desk, John Henry standing on the right and Mrs. J. L. Rivard is off to the left.

Story by Steve Penick, Head Archivist at the Stearns History Museum

Volunteers make a difference in any community. These generous individuals help the homeless, teach kids to read, and provide assistance during a natural disaster. This dedication helps not only those in need but inspires others to contribute what they can to make the world a better place.

Anna or Anne Sullivan Kyle (1891-1963) was one such person. She moved to St. Cloud, Minnesota from Minneapolis in 1926 and began volunteering for the American Red Cross. Anne reflected on what volunteering meant to her. She stated in a 1957 St. Cloud Times article, “It’s self-satisfying. And you get pleasure out of knowing that you have really helped others.” Even though the Red Cross was her primary concern, she did not limit herself to just one organization.

In this world, people should be kept busy on something worthwhile, either church work or some charitable work. It does everyone some good.

Kyle also volunteered for the Auxiliary at the Wallace S. Chute Post in 1927 and rapidly worked her way toward president of the Sixth District several years later. Soon Anne reached the state level as a member of the Rehabilitation Committee, one in which she chaired. In her spare time, Anne became president of the Women’s Guild and the St. Cloud Area Council of the Parent and Teachers Association.

Anne’s work with the Red Cross would in time transition into a staff position. Despite the death of her husband Edwin in 1938, she continued her efforts to help the St. Cloud community. In 1942, Anne was appointed Executive Secretary, encouraging others to volunteer and help in the war effort. Her humble philosophy, though, continued to be a model for others. “In this world, people should be kept busy on something worthwhile, either church work or some charitable work. It does everyone some good.” Almost sixty years later, Kyle’s words ring true about her commitment in making a better community.

Originally published on the Stearns History Museum Facebook page, this story appears here with permission. Thank you!

Stars aligned for dancing, raising funds in Mankato

Local Red Cross board chair Ben Hoffmann in Dancing with the Mankato Stars. Photo Jackson Forderer/Mankato Free Press
Local Red Cross board chair Ben Hoffman performs in Dancing with the Mankato Stars. Photo Jackson Forderer/Mankato Free Press

For the fifth year, the stars aligned in Mankato for a successful Dancing With the Mankato Stars (DWTMS) on February 11, 2017.

More than 2,500 people filled the sold-out Verizon Event Center to watch 11 couples and one group of religious sisters dance to support the American Red Cross serving Southwest Minnesota. The event was spearheaded by the DWTMS board and Dance Express.

Thank you to everyone who helped make this event happen, including more than 30 Red Cross volunteers. Through sponsorships and donations, the event raised over $123,400.

Click here to see more great photos.

My son’s superheroes are Red Cross volunteers

Story and photos by Kristen Threinen, Nurse Assistant Training Program Manager, American Red Cross 

rco_blog_img_noah-t-shirt-2Following a quick visit to our Red Cross centennial kick-off celebration in Minneapolis, my son Noah has had a lot of questions about the Red Cross.

And then, several days later, Noah’s 2nd grade class was given the option to dress-up as their favorite superhero. When I asked him that Tuesday evening (the day I received communication about dress-up day) if he wanted to dress-up he promptly responded, “YES!” He then stated he wanted to dress as a “real-life superhero,” a Red Cross volunteer.

img_0650-3I frantically emailed a co-worker, asking if there was any way I could purchase a Red Cross T-shirt. The co-worker came through as my Red Cross superhero with the shirt Noah’s wearing above.

Noah was beyond proud going to school dressed as a Red Cross superhero. And then, having the opportunity to walk with me in the St. Paul Winter Carnival parade was the icing on the cake!

rco_blog_img_noahI’m so grateful to have the opportunity to expose my son to the Red Cross mission to reduce human suffering…it’s humbling and inspiring.

Click here to learn more about Minnesota Red Cross Century of Service events throughout 2017. Also, use the social media hashtag #MNRedCross100 to share your Red Cross stories with us.

Red Cross Kicks Off Minnesota Centennial with Open House Success

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Historical dress-up photo booth. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

Story by Red Cross volunteer Tara Niebeling

Thursday, January 19 marked the first of many events in a year-long centennial celebration for the America Red Cross Minnesota Region. Volunteers from across the state gathered to display, experience and share in the huge variety of services the American Red Cross provides to Minnesotans and across the globe. From a visual history of the iconic Red Cross pin to an interactive refugee camp simulation, hundreds of guests took themselves on a self-guided tour through 100 years of rich Red Cross history.

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CPR demonstration. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

All three floors of the Minnesota region’s headquarters were buzzing with excitement for this milestone. One of my first stops was to learn about fire preparedness. “In my experience, more than half of the fires I responded to were caused by grease pans,” said Meredith Lindley, DAT volunteer for more than a year. “People know candles or kids playing with matches are top causes, but the grease pan in your oven is more dangerous than you’d think.” You can bet I went home and cleaned my grease pan that night!

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Emergency Response Vehicle talk. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

I then headed to the garage to check out the ERV, or the Emergency Response Vehicle, to get a sneak peek into what the Red Cross road warriors experience when delivering relief all over the country. Red Cross volunteer Richard Underdahl-Pierce answered all our questions about the truck, how many meals it can bring to those in need and how often the truck is in action.

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Blood pressure check in the Nurse Assistant Training classroom. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

“Tonight we are celebrating what the Red Cross has been over the past 100 years, but also what we’re doing today and what we’re doing going forward in our communities,” said Phil Hansen, CEO of the America Red Cross Minnesota Region. “Reaching this 100-year milestone proves that our mission really resonates with people and continues to do so.”

Centennial celebrations throughout the year include a Dancing with the Stars in Mankato, a celebratory breakfast to recognize corporate and foundation partners, volunteer recognition events, a signature Heroes Awards and Centennial Gala and more. See a complete list of the celebrations and how you can get involved here.

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Historical trunk used for Services to Armed Forces. Photo credit: Lynette Nyman/American Red Cross

My many conversations throughout the evening yielded a clear conclusion. The Red Cross has maintained the agility over the years to be flexible according to the needs of the American people. In Minnesota, as those needs have changed and evolved over the past 100 years, so have the programs offered by the organization. This centennial celebration is an opportunity to look back and appreciate how the organization has served the people

Click here to learn more about the American Red Cross Centennial Celebration.